Playing With Loose Parts

When we go bush walking with our kids, we always come across a multitude of natural loose parts – rocks, stumps, sand, twigs, bark, logs and water to name a few. They come with no specific instructions and the children alone can decide on how to use and/or combine materials. Playing with loose parts can assist in the holistic development of children because:

  • Loose parts can be adapted and manipulated in many ways, exercising children’s gross and fine motor skills.
  • Loose parts can be used in any way the children choose, encouraging creativity.
  • Loose parts encourage open-ended conversations between multiple players, allowing children to practice social, emotional, and language skills.

Loose parts in nature come for free, but we always ask our kids to leave anything they pick up for the creatures, great and small, who may need them. We also don’t have room in the car anyway. Of course, Andrew and I are always at hand to guide play, just in case sticks, turn into ninja nunchucks.

“Giving meaning to loose parts requires us to think about the possibilities of how a child learns and consider the materials and environments she uses. Loose parts create endless possibilities and invite creativity. For example, if a child picks up a rock and starts to play, most likely that rock can become anything the child wants it to be. Imagination, creativity, curiosity, desire, and need are the motivation of loose parts.”

– Mincemoyer, C (2016), “Loose Parts, What Does This Mean

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