Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island

Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island

Away from the Australian island continent, on the lower eastern side of the island state of Tasmania, lies Bruny Island. Five years ago, Andrew and I were lured to Bruny by the prospect of fresh seafood and cheese.  Five years and two toilet-trained and non-stroller dependent kids later, we went back ready to explore some of the bushwalks the island had to offer.  We started with the Grass Point Trail which started on the beach to the right of the Fluted Cape parking area.  

Start of the Grass Point Track, Adventure Bay, Tasmania
What started with "We'll just touch the water mummy," led to a wardrobe change for my son who, as usual, ended up jumping in.
At the start of Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island
Cold receptors triggered, the kids moved to dry sand.

At 11am, there were already families coming back from the trail as  Andrew and I lingered at the start dusting off wet sand. A passing walker recounted how the track took 40 minutes walking in, then 20 minutes walking back. I thanked him and waved to his school-aged children. In the background I could hear Andrew imploring our kids to continue walking.  I mentally doubled, then tripled, the kind walker’s figures.  

Start of the Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island
The start was in sight.
Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island
The Tasman Sea to the left, land for sale to the right.

The land for sale to the right of the start of the track triggered my memory of a conversation I overheard at the local oyster place the day before. “You must have to travel out of the island to find things to do,” said a lady in her 40s. “It’s so quiet here, what do you do for fun?” her friend added swilling her white wine. Not missing a beat, the stubbled beanie-wearing waiter, the object of condescension or perhaps flirtation, replied, “Oh I keep busy, I bought 40 acres of land in South Bruny a few years ago and I spend my time camping in and exploring it when I’m not working here.”  Anyway, I wondered, will that part of Bruny be subdvided, sold, and commercialised in a few years time or will the owner protect it and keep it wild ala JD Tipper and Mougamarra Nature Reserve? Time will tell.

White wallaby at the Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island
Squint view of a white wallaby.
Basking cormorant at Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island
Cormorant basking in the 16°C Bruny Island summer.

Andrew and I trailed behind the kids, him taking photos, me finding gaps in the trees to look for seabirds through my binoculars. Our children busied themselves inspecting and collecting what I hoped were gum nuts and not scat, assessing sticks for walking stick suitability, and pointing out insects along the track.   

Shedded cicada skin, Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island
"They're sort of like hermit crabs then mummy," my daughter observed when I explained this might be a discarded cicada shell."
Ants on the Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island
My son followed a few to try and locate their "ant house".

At one point, my son tripped on the track. I suspect it was because his shoes didn’t really have much tread. He was left with some shallow cuts on his forehead imprinted by the gravel he fell on.  Andrew dispensed some lollipop treats that comforted our son enough to stop crying, but he refused to walk. Some reshuffling of cameras, binoculars and bags between Andrew and I, followed by a safety talk on how to eat a lollipop while sitting on mummy’s shoulder, then we were ready to continue on.  

Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island Tasmania
The Grass Point Trail branches off to the right leading to the Fluted Cape Trail. Another walk for another year.
Through a grove of trees with blackened trunks and bare branches.

The trail ended on a pebbly beach. A few hundred metres away, a tour boat gently bobbed up and down to the beat of the waves.  Our  kids waved and shouted, their hellos muted by the wind. Some people on the boat waved bacwhile most continued to look intently to the right of where we were standing.  Intrigued, I urged the kids to continue walking along the beach to investigate. We were rewarded with a view of a rocky outcrop in front of Penguin Island where terns, seagulls, and cormorants rested.  

It's not often that we come across a variety of seabirds in one spot.
An old man resting on a large piece of driftwood patiently explained to my son that these were kelp - slimy and soft when wet and rough and leathery when dried.

Our walk back the way we came was spent by everyone listening to my son pointing out where his blood dripped all over the trail although in reality, only a pin prick blood was spilled where his forehead hit the gravel. We played along as this distracted into walking most of the track back.

Grass Point Trail, Bruny Island
Miss 5-year-old: "That was a fun walk mummy." Mummy: "Which bit was fun?" Miss 5-year-old: "The beach at the start. Hurry up!"
Beach in front of Fluted Cape Parking Area, Bruny Island
Back to the car to get more dry clothes.

Some shelf back in Sydney lay a partially read copy of Adam Nicolson’s “The Seabirds Cry: The Lives and Loves of Puffins, Gannets, and Other Ocean Voyagers” and Jeannie Baker’s children‘s book about kelp, “The Hidden Forest”.  The Grass Point Trail enriched our reading nights when we got back home, bringing us closer to the world and creatures we thought we’d only ever see through books  

Distance:

Pram/Wheelchair:

Map:

4 kilometres return

No

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